Pete Freitag Pete Freitag

Recursively Counting files by Extension on Mac or Linux

linux

Count Files by extension

Back in 2004 I wrote up a blog entry showing how to get a count of files by a specific extension. For example you want to know how many js files are in a directory, you can run this:

find /some/dir | fgrep -c '.js'

The -c in grep tells it to count the matches, I'm using fgrep here because I'm not using a regex (to avoid escaping the dot).

The above would also match a file, or a directory had .js anywhere in the path, so we could improve that script by using a regular expression $ character, for example:

find /some/dir | grep -c '\.js$'

Now we are limiting the .js to show up only at the end of the file.

What if you want a listing of all file extensions and the count of files in a directory?

Here's one way to print out a list of extensions and the number of files of each type:

find /some/dir -type f | grep -o ".[^.]\+$" | sort | uniq -c

This will print out a nice list like this:

5 .js
3 .html
1 .css

How it works

First we have find /some/dir -type f which just limits find to output all the files in the directory recursively. The -type f omits directories from showing up in the list.

Next we have grep -o ".[^.]\+$" the -o tells grep to only output lines that match the pattern, and only output the match. The pattern is just a regex that says look for a dot followed by one or more chars that are not a dot [^.]\+, at the end of a line $.

Next we pipe into the sort command which just puts every thing in order.

Finally we pipe into uniq -c which counts each unique line (the file extensions) and prints out the results. Cool!


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Recursively Counting files by Extension on Mac or Linux was first published on October 09, 2019.

If you like reading about unix, linux, bash, mac, grep, sort, or uniq then you might also like:

Comments

Next we have grep -o ".[^.]\+$" the -o tells grep to only output lines that match the pattern, and only output the match. The pattern is just a regex that says look for a dot followed by one or more chars that are not a dot [^.]\+, at the end of a line $.
by sdd on 11/01/2019 at 1:02:02 PM UTC
find -type f | grep -o ".[^./]\+$" | sort | uniq -c | sort -n include / in [^./] to exclude results with no file extension but . in a directory name in the path
by Brendan on 05/15/2020 at 6:00:35 PM UTC

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